Indian National Node for Neuro Informatics

Neuroinformatics is an emerging research area at the interface between information technology with and brain research. It covers all aspects of study the brain, including its form, function, development, and illnesses. Techniques of particular interest are the many kinds of neuroimaging and the analysis of such images, brain databases of all kinds, and computational modeling of brain function.

Mission Statement
The goal of INNNI is to promote neuroinformatics activities in India. This includes:

  • Providing a forum for researchers with an interest in neuroinformatics to coordinate their activities, exchange ideas, and interact with the international neuroinformatics community.
  • Representing India and Indian researchers at international neuroinformatics fora.
  • Spreading neuroinformatics education and activities through annual workshops and summer schools in current topics in neuroinformatics
  • Representing and supporting member neuroinformatics activities to funding agencies.
  • Providing technical, academic, and funding tie-ups with international neuroinformatics efforts
  • Coordinating and projecting Indian innovations in multi-institutional neuroinformatics projects.
     

The Indian National Node for NeuroInformatics was established in 2009 as a hub to bring together researchers across India and to connect them to the community of neuroinformatics researchers around the world. INNNI is one of the National Nodes of the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility, (INCF)

PhD opportunities in Neuroinformatics and Computational Neuroscience


Some of the participants in INCF introductory workshop in  NeuroInformatics, NBRC, Manesar, November 2011



Projects

A summary of Indian Node activities is presented on a poster presented at the INCF Nodes meeting in Stockholm, 18-19 April 2012.

Details of member projects are available on their websites



Highlighted projects

Standards efforts


 

One of the major goals of the INCF and INNNI is to promote interoperability of neuroinformatics software. There is a multitude of softwares and model description languages in the field. The reuse of models is limited by the fact that models described in one language for one software cannot be simulated using another software or combined with models simulated using another software. The group of Dr. Bhalla is involved in international efforts to specify standards for exchanging models in computational neuroscience and systems biology. These include INCF NineML standard for specifying neuronal network models, NeuroML and Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML).